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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
Josezette: Bite my style

From short pants to cool hats and bags big enough to hold a filing cabinet, bike messengers everywhere have a unique style. Riding a bike through the crowded streets of any city requires a wardrobe of practicality and freshness that clearly distinguishes couriers from geared-up roadies. Posers on shiny new Treks with "messenger style" bags from "The Gap" should take notes...

It's not just a bag, it's a money sack. The more stuff you stuff in your sack, the more money you make. Size does matter! Bags come in all shapes and sizes. There are bags big enough for two small children, bags with all nine planets artfully sewn onto the flap. There are pockets everywhere, pockets inside of pockets. Pockets hiding inside of seams and underneath straps. Then there are straps, straps that tie around your shoulders, waist, elbows and ankles. Custom made bags by R.E.Load and Bailey Works are among the favorites. A good bag is as important as the bike. It has to be able to carry all the necessities for a day in the life of a messenger, along with a case of PBR and a bag of ice.

Most messengers don't wear a helmet for obvious reasons, so a cool hat is essential. Hats can range from a shrunken ball cap to a trucker's lid. Wool is the way to go in cooler temperatures. It's important to have something to cover the ears and to keep the sun out of the eyes. Sock hats are popular among messengers. They're fairly inexpensive at the Army & Navy Discount store, plus you can easily sew on the patch of your favorite straight-edged punk band. Every messenger sews. Holes turn up in all kinds of places and duct tape won't always do the trick.

Josezette: Bite my style

Duct tape fashion has taken on a life of it's own among the couriers here in the south. Sometimes, you just don't want to let go of that three year old pair of Dickies. So when your saddle warmer is dangling inches above street level, in plain sight of every car behind you, duct tape will prolong the life of your pants. There are even courier bags made entirely out of this versatile adhesive. Wallets of every size are another inventive accessory. Shoes can be held together with a little minor surgery; duct tape makes a perfect bandage for any old worn out sole. The next time you are pissed that you tore up your new Patagonia rain pants, don't chuck 'em, duct 'em. Nothing beats a cold day like a cool hoody. Throw away that Old Navy sweater before it comes to life and strangles you. Hoody will keep you warm. A pullover fleece is thick enough for any winter day when layered with a good windbreaker. They come in cool messenger colors, like black and blue. They have a convenient pouch in the front where you can keep your spare pens or bike parts. A hoody is a messenger's best friend when the weather turns on him. The hood covers the head to shut out brutal wind and screaming cars. You can be creative with your hoody, use screen printing or fabric paint and stencils. Messenger gear is a canvas for many of the artistic minds that pedal the streets.

The Ghetto Fabulous messenger kicks out the fresh Vans in high gear for any time of year. Feet are important. Not only is it important to keep your toes warm, but your socks must be cool. Thankfully, there are a thousand creative socks out there. Among the favorites from SockGuy are beer drinking socks, flames, aliens, bite me's, eight balls and so on. So you show off your attitude without actually saying anything. Wear your mood swing with your skater shoes and shove some suit's face into it on the elevator without even laying a finger on them. Skater shoes are comfortable but thick enough to be used as an emergency brake. They compliment any pedal nicely. Vans has a line of biking shoes with cleats for those who are more clipless minded.

Josezette: Bite my style

Don't leave the house without your pants, please. People will notice. They won't mind if you cut them off to keep your leg from getting caught up in the chain. No one wants you to flip over the handle bars and face plant into their car hood. That's simply not cool. Messengers cut their pants for their own safety as well as a powerful fashion statement that says, "I can walk through water." Dickies are ideal for many reasons: The thicker material dries quickly in the rain and keeps the wind out. The back pockets are good for ID and a snot rag. You don't have a snot rag? Use that old pair of cotton panties that your ex-girlfriend left over at your house. You know you still have them. What better way to keep her fresh in your mind than by blowing snot into her unmentionables? Your face will thank you for it.

Messengers everywhere have their own unique style based on climate, comfort, and affordability. It's important to keep in mind that anything you wear in the street has a short life span due to the hazardous conditions of everyday wear. T-shirts get covered in exhaust after a few months. Pants seemingly melt off of your saddle squeezer. Shoes split open and end up covered in black soot. It's not easy maintaining a fresh style amidst such cruel elements. Most messengers are naturally stylish just by remaining true to themselves. Their love for freedom and excitement adds to the mystique of a subculture that takes trends by the horns, leaving followers in the dust, literally. Ghetto fabulous is hanging from their backs and dripping down their faces. Next time you take your shiny new bike out for a ride, don't forget to bite my style.

Josezette: Bite my style

From short pants to cool hats and bags big enough to hold a filing cabinet, bike messengers everywhere have a unique style. Riding a bike through the crowded streets of any city requires a wardrobe of practicality and freshness that clearly distinguishes couriers from geared-up roadies. Posers on shiny new Treks with "messenger style" bags from "The Gap" should take notes...

It's not just a bag, it's a money sack. The more stuff you stuff in your sack, the more money you make. Size does matter! Bags come in all shapes and sizes. There are bags big enough for two small children, bags with all nine planets artfully sewn onto the flap. There are pockets everywhere, pockets inside of pockets. Pockets hiding inside of seams and underneath straps. Then there are straps, straps that tie around your shoulders, waist, elbows and ankles. Custom made bags by R.E.Load and Bailey Works are among the favorites. A good bag is as important as the bike. It has to be able to carry all the necessities for a day in the life of a messenger, along with a case of PBR and a bag of ice.

Most messengers don't wear a helmet for obvious reasons, so a cool hat is essential. Hats can range from a shrunken ball cap to a trucker's lid. Wool is the way to go in cooler temperatures. It's important to have something to cover the ears and to keep the sun out of the eyes. Sock hats are popular among messengers. They're fairly inexpensive at the Army & Navy Discount store, plus you can easily sew on the patch of your favorite straight-edged punk band. Every messenger sews. Holes turn up in all kinds of places and duct tape won't always do the trick.

Josezette: Bite my style

Duct tape fashion has taken on a life of it's own among the couriers here in the south. Sometimes, you just don't want to let go of that three year old pair of Dickies. So when your saddle warmer is dangling inches above street level, in plain sight of every car behind you, duct tape will prolong the life of your pants. There are even courier bags made entirely out of this versatile adhesive. Wallets of every size are another inventive accessory. Shoes can be held together with a little minor surgery; duct tape makes a perfect bandage for any old worn out sole. The next time you are pissed that you tore up your new Patagonia rain pants, don't chuck 'em, duct 'em. Nothing beats a cold day like a cool hoody. Throw away that Old Navy sweater before it comes to life and strangles you. Hoody will keep you warm. A pullover fleece is thick enough for any winter day when layered with a good windbreaker. They come in cool messenger colors, like black and blue. They have a convenient pouch in the front where you can keep your spare pens or bike parts. A hoody is a messenger's best friend when the weather turns on him. The hood covers the head to shut out brutal wind and screaming cars. You can be creative with your hoody, use screen printing or fabric paint and stencils. Messenger gear is a canvas for many of the artistic minds that pedal the streets.

The Ghetto Fabulous messenger kicks out the fresh Vans in high gear for any time of year. Feet are important. Not only is it important to keep your toes warm, but your socks must be cool. Thankfully, there are a thousand creative socks out there. Among the favorites from SockGuy are beer drinking socks, flames, aliens, bite me's, eight balls and so on. So you show off your attitude without actually saying anything. Wear your mood swing with your skater shoes and shove some suit's face into it on the elevator without even laying a finger on them. Skater shoes are comfortable but thick enough to be used as an emergency brake. They compliment any pedal nicely. Vans has a line of biking shoes with cleats for those who are more clipless minded.

Josezette: Bite my style

Don't leave the house without your pants, please. People will notice. They won't mind if you cut them off to keep your leg from getting caught up in the chain. No one wants you to flip over the handle bars and face plant into their car hood. That's simply not cool. Messengers cut their pants for their own safety as well as a powerful fashion statement that says, "I can walk through water." Dickies are ideal for many reasons: The thicker material dries quickly in the rain and keeps the wind out. The back pockets are good for ID and a snot rag. You don't have a snot rag? Use that old pair of cotton panties that your ex-girlfriend left over at your house. You know you still have them. What better way to keep her fresh in your mind than by blowing snot into her unmentionables? Your face will thank you for it.

Messengers everywhere have their own unique style based on climate, comfort, and affordability. It's important to keep in mind that anything you wear in the street has a short life span due to the hazardous conditions of everyday wear. T-shirts get covered in exhaust after a few months. Pants seemingly melt off of your saddle squeezer. Shoes split open and end up covered in black soot. It's not easy maintaining a fresh style amidst such cruel elements. Most messengers are naturally stylish just by remaining true to themselves. Their love for freedom and excitement adds to the mystique of a subculture that takes trends by the horns, leaving followers in the dust, literally. Ghetto fabulous is hanging from their backs and dripping down their faces. Next time you take your shiny new bike out for a ride, don't forget to bite my style.

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