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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
Essential Cycling Tool kit

Chances are that if you are riding your bike casually or just around your neighborhood with your kids, you'll never need a tool kit. You'll never be so far away that you can't simply walk the bike home.

However, as you begin riding to train or as an athletic pursuit, you're gonna slowly wander further and further away from home base. If you are out by yourself, or on a club, or charity ride, there is an absolute guarantee that you will break down and it will invariably be at the point farthest from any help. So, what will you need to get yourself home at the extreme end of a 60 mile loop?

Here's a list of the basic tools you'll need to handle most on road emergency situations. Click the item below in the list for detailed info on what the each object is and how it is used.

There are differing ideas of what constitutes a BASIC tool kit, and what constitutes the deluxe edition. If you don't want to be a burden on the group you ride with, or to your family at home by making them drive out to pick you up, a Multi-tool, Pump, Money, and Patch Kit will get you through most problems. Everything else can be an add on, unless of course you're an old man like me and need your creature comforts. Hey I don't care about the weight, I'm not Lance Armstrong and I ain't racing so I bring all this stuff!

The larger issue here is actually tools you need to keep the engine of the bike going! Without you pedaling on top, your bike will not get very far. So think about this before you leave and make certain you have all you need to take care of yourself. Special medicines you might need, insulin for example, are good things to think about taking along if you might need them. But also bring along the everyday stuff like water, sports drink, energy goo, a deck of poker cards or whatever floats your boat! You can unexpectedly bonk or dehydrate even on a short ride. So ride prepared to service the bike's engine too!

Mini Frame Pump

Pump: I use both the larger size spring loaded one that fits inside the frame of the bike, and when I am lazy the smaller "mountain bike" style about the same length as the average water bottle. Now there is a reason the shorty pumps are used on Mountain bikes. Their tires are lower pressure! Every time I have been on a ride with folks who flatted their road bike and they had a shorty pump with them, they invariably borrowed my full size pump to take their tire closer to road tire pressures. So my advice, if you ride a road bike get a frame sized pump! CO2 pumps can be a time saver but sometimes they are unreliable so always carry a manual pump as well.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Tire Levers

Tire levers: OK if you are Andre the Giant, you can muscle your tire off the rim with your bare hands, but tire irons do it a lot quicker. The plastic nesting ones take up almost no space, weigh nothing, and work much better than the ones on your multi tool. Carry them along. They are really a must have!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

tubes

Spare tubes: Never leave home without them! Yes you can patch a tube, but when it is freezing or raining, or you are barely keeping pace with the peloton, rip out the tube with the hole, check the tire for imbedded objects and fire off with the new tube. I carry heavy tubes for replacement on the road to help resist re-punctures, but some folks carry lite or race tubes. Suit yourself!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Mini Glueless Patch Kit

Patch kits: The ones you see here are glueless quick patches. I use the old fashioned ones, Dan uses quick self adhesive redi-patches. What ever kind you use make certain to get a new kit every season. The glue will dry out on both kinds after a summer in the sun. Check the "Fixing Flats on The Go" article under New Articles for tips on flat repairs

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

The Alien Multi Tool

Multi-Tool: Pictured here is the Topeak Alien, but any decent multi-tool will do. OK so what is a multi tool? The easier question is what is it not? OK off the top of my head it is a/an: Allen Wrench set, tire irons (poorest tool of the set carry regular ones), knife/saw, open end wrench, chain tool, Torx screwdriver, screwdriver, bottle opener, Spoke Wrenches, pedal wrench.

Packed in a neat Nylon carrying case, this item combines virtually every tool you will need in an emergency situation. On the road it will serve very nicely for all but the most disastrous repairs. The tool splits neatly in half for use and folds into itself for storage.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Cable Ties

Cable ties: Use for everything from keeping baggy cuffs out of your chain ring to holding the wheel in the dropouts (not recommended). You can use a cable tie to repair the world, unless of course you left them home.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Rubber

Tube sections: The primary reason I carry pieces of old inner tubes is for repairs of the side wall of a tire. You can patch a tube, but a sidewall blow out is almost a guaranteed trip on the sag wagon. Unless you are lucky enough to have a section of old inner tube to put over the hole in the sidewall (inside). Then insert a new tube, inflate with a reduced pressure, and ride off slow and easy, and maybe you can make it to the next pit without sagging!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Map

Map: It is possible to get lost, even on a supported ride. Although on a supported ride with sag services, you generally have a number you can call to get help, but if you are on your own, having a map really helps. Even if all you want it for is site seeing highlights!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Pills

Medicine: Now Dan took out my plastic film can and replaced it with a nice pill box, but I carry vitamins, antacids, immodium, glucosamine, aspirin, and ibuprophen in my handlebar bag. This way if I am on a multi-day event and I am sore, I have what I need. If the Gatorade chews a hole in my stomach out around Speonk, I can toss some Tums and I am good to go! Sure you can buy the stuff on the roadside, but I don't even have to stop...

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Money

Real Money: I keep a stash of folding money in the zipper part on the bottom of the seat bag. This can go a long way to helping you out on the road if your wallet is stashed in your duffle bag on the support truck and you just shredded a tire between pits. Finding the bike store won't help if you have no way to pay! It is also said that a folded dollar bill will also patch a tire sidewall hole in a pinch!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Change

Spare change: OK pay toilets, phone calls, soda machines, other vending needs, pitching pennies during a pit, it just makes sense, toss some somewhere in your kit. I keep mine in an old tire patch kit box along with spare tire valve caps and nuts. Some folks say you don't need caps on your valves, but I find that they keep out road dirt that can jam your valve open just enough to make you flat.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Raisins

Raisins: Or other dried fruit! Bonking, aka sugar crashing is a real threat to a cyclist. Pedaling away all your sugar between pits or heading home against the wind definitely sucks. Since raisins are already dried, leaving a box in your handle bar bag won't make them too much grosser after baking in the sun. If you bonk you'll be surprised how tasty they can be even if they are rock hard. Just swap em out every now and again.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Cell Phone

Cell Phone: Ok I hate them too! I do not leave mine on when riding because this is my "Quiet Time." Never even think about using your cell phone while riding! But, I have had face plants while riding, and you will too. Having a cellphone could save your life in the event of a serious accident. Bring it along, but leave it alone unless you are off you bike, especially if you ride with me!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Bag Balm

Bag Balm: OK what the heck is Bag Balm? Well it is a product from the dairy trade! It is still used today to treat cows Udders for chaffing. Farmers found that the product made even their rough hands feel smooth and soft. The product is practically pure lanolin. Now what purpose could you see for this product? When you ride your first couple of back-to-back high mileage days, you'll be begging for some bag balm to sooth certain tender areas!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Essential Cycling Tool kit

Chances are that if you are riding your bike casually or just around your neighborhood with your kids, you'll never need a tool kit. You'll never be so far away that you can't simply walk the bike home.

However, as you begin riding to train or as an athletic pursuit, you're gonna slowly wander further and further away from home base. If you are out by yourself, or on a club, or charity ride, there is an absolute guarantee that you will break down and it will invariably be at the point farthest from any help. So, what will you need to get yourself home at the extreme end of a 60 mile loop?

Here's a list of the basic tools you'll need to handle most on road emergency situations. Click the item below in the list for detailed info on what the each object is and how it is used.

There are differing ideas of what constitutes a BASIC tool kit, and what constitutes the deluxe edition. If you don't want to be a burden on the group you ride with, or to your family at home by making them drive out to pick you up, a Multi-tool, Pump, Money, and Patch Kit will get you through most problems. Everything else can be an add on, unless of course you're an old man like me and need your creature comforts. Hey I don't care about the weight, I'm not Lance Armstrong and I ain't racing so I bring all this stuff!

The larger issue here is actually tools you need to keep the engine of the bike going! Without you pedaling on top, your bike will not get very far. So think about this before you leave and make certain you have all you need to take care of yourself. Special medicines you might need, insulin for example, are good things to think about taking along if you might need them. But also bring along the everyday stuff like water, sports drink, energy goo, a deck of poker cards or whatever floats your boat! You can unexpectedly bonk or dehydrate even on a short ride. So ride prepared to service the bike's engine too!

Mini Frame Pump

Pump: I use both the larger size spring loaded one that fits inside the frame of the bike, and when I am lazy the smaller "mountain bike" style about the same length as the average water bottle. Now there is a reason the shorty pumps are used on Mountain bikes. Their tires are lower pressure! Every time I have been on a ride with folks who flatted their road bike and they had a shorty pump with them, they invariably borrowed my full size pump to take their tire closer to road tire pressures. So my advice, if you ride a road bike get a frame sized pump! CO2 pumps can be a time saver but sometimes they are unreliable so always carry a manual pump as well.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Tire Levers

Tire levers: OK if you are Andre the Giant, you can muscle your tire off the rim with your bare hands, but tire irons do it a lot quicker. The plastic nesting ones take up almost no space, weigh nothing, and work much better than the ones on your multi tool. Carry them along. They are really a must have!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

tubes

Spare tubes: Never leave home without them! Yes you can patch a tube, but when it is freezing or raining, or you are barely keeping pace with the peloton, rip out the tube with the hole, check the tire for imbedded objects and fire off with the new tube. I carry heavy tubes for replacement on the road to help resist re-punctures, but some folks carry lite or race tubes. Suit yourself!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Mini Glueless Patch Kit

Patch kits: The ones you see here are glueless quick patches. I use the old fashioned ones, Dan uses quick self adhesive redi-patches. What ever kind you use make certain to get a new kit every season. The glue will dry out on both kinds after a summer in the sun. Check the "Fixing Flats on The Go" article under New Articles for tips on flat repairs

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

The Alien Multi Tool

Multi-Tool: Pictured here is the Topeak Alien, but any decent multi-tool will do. OK so what is a multi tool? The easier question is what is it not? OK off the top of my head it is a/an: Allen Wrench set, tire irons (poorest tool of the set carry regular ones), knife/saw, open end wrench, chain tool, Torx screwdriver, screwdriver, bottle opener, Spoke Wrenches, pedal wrench.

Packed in a neat Nylon carrying case, this item combines virtually every tool you will need in an emergency situation. On the road it will serve very nicely for all but the most disastrous repairs. The tool splits neatly in half for use and folds into itself for storage.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Cable Ties

Cable ties: Use for everything from keeping baggy cuffs out of your chain ring to holding the wheel in the dropouts (not recommended). You can use a cable tie to repair the world, unless of course you left them home.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Rubber

Tube sections: The primary reason I carry pieces of old inner tubes is for repairs of the side wall of a tire. You can patch a tube, but a sidewall blow out is almost a guaranteed trip on the sag wagon. Unless you are lucky enough to have a section of old inner tube to put over the hole in the sidewall (inside). Then insert a new tube, inflate with a reduced pressure, and ride off slow and easy, and maybe you can make it to the next pit without sagging!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Map

Map: It is possible to get lost, even on a supported ride. Although on a supported ride with sag services, you generally have a number you can call to get help, but if you are on your own, having a map really helps. Even if all you want it for is site seeing highlights!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Pills

Medicine: Now Dan took out my plastic film can and replaced it with a nice pill box, but I carry vitamins, antacids, immodium, glucosamine, aspirin, and ibuprophen in my handlebar bag. This way if I am on a multi-day event and I am sore, I have what I need. If the Gatorade chews a hole in my stomach out around Speonk, I can toss some Tums and I am good to go! Sure you can buy the stuff on the roadside, but I don't even have to stop...

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Money

Real Money: I keep a stash of folding money in the zipper part on the bottom of the seat bag. This can go a long way to helping you out on the road if your wallet is stashed in your duffle bag on the support truck and you just shredded a tire between pits. Finding the bike store won't help if you have no way to pay! It is also said that a folded dollar bill will also patch a tire sidewall hole in a pinch!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Change

Spare change: OK pay toilets, phone calls, soda machines, other vending needs, pitching pennies during a pit, it just makes sense, toss some somewhere in your kit. I keep mine in an old tire patch kit box along with spare tire valve caps and nuts. Some folks say you don't need caps on your valves, but I find that they keep out road dirt that can jam your valve open just enough to make you flat.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Raisins

Raisins: Or other dried fruit! Bonking, aka sugar crashing is a real threat to a cyclist. Pedaling away all your sugar between pits or heading home against the wind definitely sucks. Since raisins are already dried, leaving a box in your handle bar bag won't make them too much grosser after baking in the sun. If you bonk you'll be surprised how tasty they can be even if they are rock hard. Just swap em out every now and again.

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Cell Phone

Cell Phone: Ok I hate them too! I do not leave mine on when riding because this is my "Quiet Time." Never even think about using your cell phone while riding! But, I have had face plants while riding, and you will too. Having a cellphone could save your life in the event of a serious accident. Bring it along, but leave it alone unless you are off you bike, especially if you ride with me!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

Bag Balm

Bag Balm: OK what the heck is Bag Balm? Well it is a product from the dairy trade! It is still used today to treat cows Udders for chaffing. Farmers found that the product made even their rough hands feel smooth and soft. The product is practically pure lanolin. Now what purpose could you see for this product? When you ride your first couple of back-to-back high mileage days, you'll be begging for some bag balm to sooth certain tender areas!

Click image for larger view
click here to go back to the top

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