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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety
Wounded Warrior: Soldier Ride: Soldiers come home from war and ride to face their hardest battle... returning to a normal life.

What does it mean to be a Wounded Warrior? For many men and women in the U.S. armed services, it means to have left behind the comfort and safety of their homes and families only to trek through inhospitable lands filled with mines, enemy fire, and anti-American sentiment, possibly engaging in battle with menacing peoples and in some cases being wounded. But, for some it can mean all of the above with the added scarifice of losing one or more limbs in the process.

Feeling good? Let's make another loop around Central Park (in New York City).

Dealing with this loss is overwhelming. Soldiers who face the challenge, confusion and emotional hurdle of recovering from their injuries and being thrust back into their lives often suffer disorientation and a loss of community upon separation from their unit. Into the picture comes the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) and its services, one of which is the Soldier Ride.

A couple of adjustments make for a better, more comfortable ride.

The Wounded Warrior Project is right by the soldiers' side to provide comfort and a sense of identity almost from the moment they are wounded right through the time they transition back to civilian life. Awakening from a traumatic injury can be extremely shocking and disorienting. Soldiers are literally lifted unconscious from a battle in which they are wounded, often to wake up in another country wearing only a hospital gown with little or no knowledge of how they got there, stripped of all personal belongings beyond their dog tags. At this point the Wounded Warior Project steps in to provide these soldiers with specially prepared backpacks containing necessities such as shaving kits, underwear, socks and other personal items to begin fostering a sense of regained identity. The backpacks also contain a CD player and some other articles to help provide diversion from what can be hours, days, and more of waiting, giving these injured servicemen something to hold onto as they come to understand what has happened to them. Many of the soldiers receiving the backpacks say "It helps make them feel human again".

Taking a bike ride is a sweet reward that can truly be savored

Back at home the WWP will help shepherd the injured soldiers through the process of regaining an active lifestyle through their adaptive sports programs. In the case of the Soldier Ride, the WWP will outfit the soldiers with adaptive devices to enable them to participate in a healthy, invirgorating and liberating sport that will ultimately help them learn how, and gain the strength, to lead an independent life once again. This not only gives the soldiers the personal empowerment of knowing they can return to an active life but presents a highly visible display to other Americans (including other injured veterans) of the services available to them at the WWP.
Cycling is really the perfect sport for amputees. There's no impact. -John Fernandez, injured while fighting in Iraq

The heightened public awareness that the The Soldier Ride brings to the Wounded Warrior Project has a two fold benefit. Not only does it get the word out that there is help for wounded servicemen but, the ride itself is a fundraiser for the WWP. The first Solider ride (held in 2004 and run by Chris Carney) raised over 1 million dollars that went directly toward bringing more services and assistance to injured veterans.

rule
From inside the ride:
The soldiers that take part in this event were wounded in battle. This gives them a unique knowledge of other servicemens' needs as injured soldeirs themselves. Also, the organizers are mostly veterans as well. They all know first hand what struggles will be faced both in life and on the road...

Chris Carney, rode the Soldier Ride

We had the opportunity to speak with Woody Groton, former U.S. Army Major and Ride Director of the Soldier Ride (a self-proclaimed bike nut who has raced road, mountain bikes and cyclocross).

He had this to add about the ride:
"From the beginning of a Soldier Ride segment to the end, you can really see a difference, it kind of energizes them (the soldiers). Without having spent time with them it's really hard to imagine. For instance, my father came along to act as a staff driver for me and he called my sister almost in tears talking about these guys. Because it's just such an incredible thing just to see them (taking back their lives)"

BACK ON TRACK: Some info and statistics about Prosthetics.

When asked about the improvements made in the prosthetics, Woody stated "...the people at Walter Reed are doing their best... ...now the prosthetics are so good, that even a guy who's a bilateral above the knee amputee can actually ride a regular bike."

And about the guys on the road and the ride itself, "You know the guys like to be pushed because they're military, because they're Marines, they're Airborne Rangers, they're paratroopers, they're all that kind... So they have that mentality...

Staff Sergeant Christopher Millward, is missing one leg, was actually hit in April of this year, but here he is two months later hand cycling. His goal is to get back in the bomb suit and get back on EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Status... We had dinner the night before the Manhattan Ride with the NYFD and he was sitting there talking with the fire fighters, and the New York City Police Department defused five live bombs last year and that was like a big deal for them. In nine months in Iraq, Staff Sergeant Millward defused 750 live bombs or IED's. He just can't wait to get back when he is strong enough. To get his prosthetic, and get back in the bomb suit and do his job. All of these guys, if they could get back to their unit tomorrow they would...
Signaling a return to a normal life, New Yorkers walk by the Warriors without even noticing anything out of the ordinary.

...we ended up cycling from Ground Zero up the West Side Highway with a Police escort, and then we did a lap of Central Park. Had I really thought about it, we probably should have done two or three laps around the Park, simply because it's such a lovely place to ride.

rule

The Soldier Ride came about as a result of the brainstorming of the minds of Chris Carney and some of his buddies from a local night club in Amangansett, N.Y. along with John Melia (Founder of the Wounded Warrior Project). Carney who had run a successful local fundraiser to help a soldier in his town who had been wounded in Iraq, decided he wanted to do more. He and his friends visited the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. They were so moved by the experience that they met with Melia to see how they could help. Melia suggested a ride. The Soldier ride was born.

Joking around after the agility test of riding through the busy streets of New York City.

Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun U.S. Army (Ret.) who lost both of his legs in Iraq and is now a spokesman and counselor to the newly injured for the WWP joined the ride in 2005. Calhoun made that coast-to-coast journey using his hands on a specially outfitted handcycle. Each year the Soldier Ride revises the route and destinations of the event. In 2005 (when it was still an independent event, held to help the WWP) riders like Chris Carney and Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun rode 4200 miles coast to coast, across the country picking up rider soldiers along the way.

Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun: Bilateral Amputee above the knee, handcycles across 4200 miles across the America.

Look for this year's route and spots where you can come out and cheer the riders on at:
::www.woundedwarriorproject.org::


Make a donation to help injured soldiers at:
::Donate Here::


Soldiers aren't the only ones affected by their injuries. Friends, family and loved ones come out to show support.

Wounded Warrior: Soldier Ride: Soldiers come home from war and ride to face their hardest battle... returning to a normal life.

What does it mean to be a Wounded Warrior? For many men and women in the U.S. armed services, it means to have left behind the comfort and safety of their homes and families only to trek through inhospitable lands filled with mines, enemy fire, and anti-American sentiment, possibly engaging in battle with menacing peoples and in some cases being wounded. But, for some it can mean all of the above with the added scarifice of losing one or more limbs in the process.

Feeling good? Let's make another loop around Central Park (in New York City).

Dealing with this loss is overwhelming. Soldiers who face the challenge, confusion and emotional hurdle of recovering from their injuries and being thrust back into their lives often suffer disorientation and a loss of community upon separation from their unit. Into the picture comes the Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) and its services, one of which is the Soldier Ride.

A couple of adjustments make for a better, more comfortable ride.

The Wounded Warrior Project is right by the soldiers' side to provide comfort and a sense of identity almost from the moment they are wounded right through the time they transition back to civilian life. Awakening from a traumatic injury can be extremely shocking and disorienting. Soldiers are literally lifted unconscious from a battle in which they are wounded, often to wake up in another country wearing only a hospital gown with little or no knowledge of how they got there, stripped of all personal belongings beyond their dog tags. At this point the Wounded Warior Project steps in to provide these soldiers with specially prepared backpacks containing necessities such as shaving kits, underwear, socks and other personal items to begin fostering a sense of regained identity. The backpacks also contain a CD player and some other articles to help provide diversion from what can be hours, days, and more of waiting, giving these injured servicemen something to hold onto as they come to understand what has happened to them. Many of the soldiers receiving the backpacks say "It helps make them feel human again".

Taking a bike ride is a sweet reward that can truly be savored

Back at home the WWP will help shepherd the injured soldiers through the process of regaining an active lifestyle through their adaptive sports programs. In the case of the Soldier Ride, the WWP will outfit the soldiers with adaptive devices to enable them to participate in a healthy, invirgorating and liberating sport that will ultimately help them learn how, and gain the strength, to lead an independent life once again. This not only gives the soldiers the personal empowerment of knowing they can return to an active life but presents a highly visible display to other Americans (including other injured veterans) of the services available to them at the WWP.
Cycling is really the perfect sport for amputees. There's no impact. -John Fernandez, injured while fighting in Iraq

The heightened public awareness that the The Soldier Ride brings to the Wounded Warrior Project has a two fold benefit. Not only does it get the word out that there is help for wounded servicemen but, the ride itself is a fundraiser for the WWP. The first Solider ride (held in 2004 and run by Chris Carney) raised over 1 million dollars that went directly toward bringing more services and assistance to injured veterans.

rule
From inside the ride:
The soldiers that take part in this event were wounded in battle. This gives them a unique knowledge of other servicemens' needs as injured soldeirs themselves. Also, the organizers are mostly veterans as well. They all know first hand what struggles will be faced both in life and on the road...

Chris Carney, rode the Soldier Ride

We had the opportunity to speak with Woody Groton, former U.S. Army Major and Ride Director of the Soldier Ride (a self-proclaimed bike nut who has raced road, mountain bikes and cyclocross).

He had this to add about the ride:
"From the beginning of a Soldier Ride segment to the end, you can really see a difference, it kind of energizes them (the soldiers). Without having spent time with them it's really hard to imagine. For instance, my father came along to act as a staff driver for me and he called my sister almost in tears talking about these guys. Because it's just such an incredible thing just to see them (taking back their lives)"

BACK ON TRACK: Some info and statistics about Prosthetics.

When asked about the improvements made in the prosthetics, Woody stated "...the people at Walter Reed are doing their best... ...now the prosthetics are so good, that even a guy who's a bilateral above the knee amputee can actually ride a regular bike."

And about the guys on the road and the ride itself, "You know the guys like to be pushed because they're military, because they're Marines, they're Airborne Rangers, they're paratroopers, they're all that kind... So they have that mentality...

Staff Sergeant Christopher Millward, is missing one leg, was actually hit in April of this year, but here he is two months later hand cycling. His goal is to get back in the bomb suit and get back on EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Status... We had dinner the night before the Manhattan Ride with the NYFD and he was sitting there talking with the fire fighters, and the New York City Police Department defused five live bombs last year and that was like a big deal for them. In nine months in Iraq, Staff Sergeant Millward defused 750 live bombs or IED's. He just can't wait to get back when he is strong enough. To get his prosthetic, and get back in the bomb suit and do his job. All of these guys, if they could get back to their unit tomorrow they would...
Signaling a return to a normal life, New Yorkers walk by the Warriors without even noticing anything out of the ordinary.

...we ended up cycling from Ground Zero up the West Side Highway with a Police escort, and then we did a lap of Central Park. Had I really thought about it, we probably should have done two or three laps around the Park, simply because it's such a lovely place to ride.

rule

The Soldier Ride came about as a result of the brainstorming of the minds of Chris Carney and some of his buddies from a local night club in Amangansett, N.Y. along with John Melia (Founder of the Wounded Warrior Project). Carney who had run a successful local fundraiser to help a soldier in his town who had been wounded in Iraq, decided he wanted to do more. He and his friends visited the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. They were so moved by the experience that they met with Melia to see how they could help. Melia suggested a ride. The Soldier ride was born.

Joking around after the agility test of riding through the busy streets of New York City.

Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun U.S. Army (Ret.) who lost both of his legs in Iraq and is now a spokesman and counselor to the newly injured for the WWP joined the ride in 2005. Calhoun made that coast-to-coast journey using his hands on a specially outfitted handcycle. Each year the Soldier Ride revises the route and destinations of the event. In 2005 (when it was still an independent event, held to help the WWP) riders like Chris Carney and Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun rode 4200 miles coast to coast, across the country picking up rider soldiers along the way.

Staff Sergeant Heath Calhoun: Bilateral Amputee above the knee, handcycles across 4200 miles across the America.

Look for this year's route and spots where you can come out and cheer the riders on at:
::www.woundedwarriorproject.org::


Make a donation to help injured soldiers at:
::Donate Here::


Soldiers aren't the only ones affected by their injuries. Friends, family and loved ones come out to show support.

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