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rule Archived Articles:
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Sea Otter 2008
Day Two
Genghis Kahn Video
Intro Day One
Choose Life Video

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Tara Llanes:
Determined to Recover
Finding your Green Self


New Feature:
Map your Rides!


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Cross Nationals
45 Minutes
Win or Lose
Gale Force Cross
Elements of Cross


Photos
Videos


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Got Pink?
Speaking With:
Magnus Bäckstedt
Wounded Warrior Project:
Phoenix to Vegas
Grow Your Own Bike?
Young Mechanics
Speaking with:
Shonny Vanlandingham
Stories From the Road:
The Spinning Stars


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Interbike
Faces on the Mountain
Cross Vegas
The Showroom Floor
A Cycling Shambhala
BMC FourStroke 03
Rock & Roll Lives at Defeet
Demo Days
WTB MX Prowler Review
Interbike 2007 Intro


Photos
Videos


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Junior Development
Voices:
Benny and Christian Zenga

Green Choices
On the Soldier Ride
The Jury is Still out...



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Pedros
Faces of Pedros
Lea Davison Teaches
Kids to MTB

Women's Skills by
Alison Dunlap

Coming alive
Going Green



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Voices: Reginald Harkema
Bike The World: New York
Team Trips For Kids
The Ironclad Triathlon
The Ride of Silence
Ladies Night at R-A-B
Bike the World
Bike Polo
Get Your Friends to Ride!



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Sea Otter
Grand Theft Velo
In the Heart and Mind
of the Beast

It's All About the Wheels
A sense of Paradox
Sea Otter: Super D
What is Sea Otter?



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Which Holiday Treat
Are You?

Raisin a Comeback
Marilyn Price:
Making Trips for Kids




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2006 CX Nationals Sidelines
2006 CX Nationals Day 2
2006 CX Nationals Day I
2006 CX Nationals Intro



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Warmth Recaptured
The Road Ahead
On The Well Worn Path
Fireflies in the
Garden of Gray

A Ride With the Cannibal
Hoop Talk



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Interbike '06
Grande Finale
Innocence Lost
Outdoor Demo
and Hangover Ride

Interbike 2006 Intro



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24 Hours of Willamette
Twilight at the Velodrome



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Pedros Fest '06
The Faces of Pedros
Not-so Still of the Night
The Bold and The Vulgar
Trailing Off
Stickers, Glue, Ribbons,
Markers

Good Times in the Sky
Downhiller Hunting at Jiminy
Pedros Fest Intro 2006



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Heart Rate Monitor
Mt. Hamilton
Critical Mass
The Mountain of the Devil
Fighting for the Finish
Hey Watch Your Feet!
Special Film Pull-out
Bicycle Film Festival
Tour du Parc
The Five Boro Bike Tour
VOICES: Peter Sutherland
VOICES: Brendt Barbur
VOICES: Jacob Septimus
Stillwell Interpretive Trail
Resurrecting the Vanderbilt
Motor Parkway

Kicking it up a Notch
Bicycle Film Festival Intro
The Fat Tire Classic
The Road to Zamora
Edison, NJ Show
Carlisle, PA Show
Bike Show Intro
SLIME Torture Test
Step Away from the Lube
Energy Crisis
CX Camp for Juniors
Gear Guide: 2006
Inside the CX Nationals
Road to Nowhere
Take it Hard, Take it Easy
Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Three

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day Two

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Day One

Liberty Mutual Cyclocross
Nationals Intro

Holiday GIFT GUIDE
The Unbearable Art
of Wrenching

Tasting the Brew
A Crewman's journey
275 Miles for Youth
Letters from the Road
Patterson Pass Insurgence
The Power of Critical Mass



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Travel:



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Interbike '05/ Las Vegas
IB '05: Red Rocks Canyon
IB '05: Indoor Expo
IB '05: Lake Mead
IB '05: Outdoor Demo II
IB '05: Outdoor Demo I
IB '05: Intro



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Pedros Fest '05
Night Moves
Roughin' It!
Words With Tinker Juarez
Pedros' Faces
Jiminy Peak Free Ride
Womens' Skills Clinic
Pedros: Day One
Pedros Intro



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Chicago
Bicyclist Haven?
What's Not to Bike?
Sites @ Night



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West Coast
Cali Travel Intro
Hitting the Wall
Lake Chabot
Tour de Truckee
Ride to Skyline



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Tarmac Tacos
The New York Bike Show
The Deluge Ride
New Jersey Bike Show
Stinging the Rio
Roaring Mouse Race Series
(Spring 2005)

The Agony and Ecstacy
of Icy Rain...

Visions in Saffron
Margo Conover Speaks Out
Repurposing
The Blizzard Ride
PBBC 2005 Season Opener
26 Degrees of Separation
The Abondoned Bike
Bite My Style:
Messenger Fashion




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Death Valley:
Two Cyclists Enter

Car-Free: Kara
Car-Free: Max
And the Winner is...
Halloween in Gotham
Battling El Diablo
Interbike: The Event
Interbike: Intro
Cape May,
A Cyclist's Dream

A d'Liteful Adventure
Catching up with
the Catskill Wheelmen

BTC Daily 2004
Crashpads:
Crash and Burn?

IBEX MTB Trail [Series]
Prelude to a Champion
Rudy Project: Part Deux
Take Time to Appreciate
Stretching for a Fit Body
A Soggy 5 Island Tour
Incident Report
The Pump Showdown
Manhattan Greenway
Burley D'Lite Pre-Review
Bike Rodeo
When Polar Bears Attack
Almighty Leap Ride
Essential Cycling Toolkit
Training up! [The Series]
Selle Italia/Cannondale Ride
Wanna do a charity ride?
PBBC 2003 Season Opener
Rudy Project Eval Ride
Fixing Flats On the Go!
The Ride Dine 9.13.03
Road Riding Safety
Winter Riding Safety
Cycles Le Femme Jerseys
Helmets and Safety

Low Art: The first impression is that it's purely an interesting newsreelesque retro piece reveling in grainy low budget panache, yet delivering the simple point of gaudy beauty on two wheels for its own sake. A deeper look shows the ubiquitous human need to express and create. The focus of the film is the creator of "Low Rider" bicycle art, gaudy chromed creations that defy labels, as do the characters. The voice of the film transcends the artist's thug exterior while the bicycle transcends its most mundane attribute... the ability to be transportation.

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands

B.I.K.E.: I have been wondering about how this review would come out since I saw the film last night. The bike scene portrayed in this film is about as far removed from my experience of bicycling as the surface of Mars is from the Appalachian Trail. Yet, as expressed in an audience question, deprecated by the producers, it answers, "Why the Bike, I mean why not a volleyball?"

We watch Tony attempt to join Black Label, a bike club in the same sense that the Dead Rabbits of the "Gangs of New York" was a club. Black Label is an accretion of social outcasts, or drop outs depending upon whose perspective you employ, whose life orbits outrageous bikes, outrageous dress, and outrageous behavior. Their lifestyle is one punctuated by the massive consumption of alcohol and other mind altering substances in quantities that would appear adequate to ossify a battalion. Once adequately lubricated our heros embark upon bike jousting. Sitting Six or seven feet above the pavement they attempt to dislodge (generally with success) each other (often both) from the seat of their "tall bikes" (multiple frames assembled to create stilt like two wheelers) only to smash assorted body parts into the pavement. Much blood and great times are spilt and had by all!

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands

Yet under this veneer of sadomasochistic excess there lurks a certain innocence, or if not innocence, then at least a Peter Pan-esque youth that insists upon calling the assembled wounded, a family. Family it is, but it is also a political unit. Elections are held, votes are disputed and decisions are made. Often times unilateral edicts are passed down from the ruling elete, others are the result of legitimate democratic process. Babies are conceived and delivered, as are sickness, joy, and sobs.

And so the group moves on from joust to joust, initiation to initiation, road trips, jet bikes, drugs, alcohol, all the elements against which the group rebells distilled, and amplified by their pain and dysfunction. They fall prey to society's ills which are amplified in their microcosm.

Examined closely under the lens of the of the film and more importantly the lens of social interaction we discover their escapism, their withdrawl and yet their insertion into topics of interest to them. They protest the war. They parade in critical mass. Their art cries out for the attention of the society they denounce. They espouse indepence from oil, and yet they build a jet bike, and it works! Far from stupid, these are intelligent talented people who have chosen another way, outside of one I understand or could embrace.

The film is as fractured as the lifestyle. Yet, in being so, it intensifies the experience of confusion and anarchy. I am lost and frequently we are lost together. Yet I enjoyed the film, and I empathized with the family and their outcasts. I felt somehow priviledged to observe, voyeuristically perhaps, a life I could not fathom.

I had the opportunity to ask Tony, why they felt the question stupid, and he replied, "Because... What? They slept through the film? Or they are baiting us? Because it is the bike man, I mean its all there."

There was an answer offered from the audience and we agreed that it was a good one... "Because the bike is the first taste of freedom, the first escape from the watchful eyes of familial control. The Bicycle is the symbol of that freedom and every time we ride we experience once again that feeling of escape." So of course it had to be the B.I.K.E.

Yogurt Vs. Gasoline by Van and Casey Neistat

Yogurt vs. Gasoline: In a short film by the Neistat Brothers humor is employed to make a political statement. The vehicle (pun intended) of their statement is a '76 Schwinn Suburban beater bike, complete with dings, dents and an ample supply of rust acquired through much neglect. Our unlikely hero, a gen X Van Neistat, awakening to his alarm only to realize that he has only a few moments to swallow back his yogurt before he does battle with his foe. In a gutsy display of slacker bravado, we learn that our hero has challenged his arch-nemisis, none other than his brother, Casey Neistat to a race Manhattan, North to South from 94th Street to Franklin and Broadway. The catch is that Van will be racing on his trusty Schwinn while Casey pilots his hand-built 916CC, Italian super bike, a Ducati Monster S4. Using iconic symbolism of the Schwinn, a bike that every child remembers as their first taste of freedom and the Ducati, the sartorial icon of speed, power and excess, to make a poignant message... Guess which icon prevails...

PEDAL by Peter Sutherland

PEDAL: An inside look, depicting the life, lifestyle and hardship of the New York City Bike Messenger. A life of supporting a family on a shoe string, and sometimes dealing with watching the shoestring snap. A life sorting out issues of destitution, substance dependence, injury without health care and life with little hope. The brotherhood of messengers is the only support for some who are part of this world and for most that is all they need. Living and dying by the clock for mere pocket change to get by, messengers have their own way of blowing off steam. PEDAL catches these messengers running Alleycat Races. Alleycats are adrenaline fueled rampages through NYC's busy streets via the fastest way possible. In defiance of the system that holds them down, they forge headlong down city streets narrowly squeezing between busses, darting through red lights within a whisker's breadth of demise. Peter Sutherland catches all of this in first person footage that makes a viewer's stomach wince and sphincter pucker in discomfort at the mere sight of the action. In a very personal and sensitive way, PEDAL captures this lifestyle in a crystalline form.

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands


Low Art: The first impression is that it's purely an interesting newsreelesque retro piece reveling in grainy low budget panache, yet delivering the simple point of gaudy beauty on two wheels for its own sake. A deeper look shows the ubiquitous human need to express and create. The focus of the film is the creator of "Low Rider" bicycle art, gaudy chromed creations that defy labels, as do the characters. The voice of the film transcends the artist's thug exterior while the bicycle transcends its most mundane attribute... the ability to be transportation.

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands

B.I.K.E.: I have been wondering about how this review would come out since I saw the film last night. The bike scene portrayed in this film is about as far removed from my experience of bicycling as the surface of Mars is from the Appalachian Trail. Yet, as expressed in an audience question, deprecated by the producers, it answers, "Why the Bike, I mean why not a volleyball?"

We watch Tony attempt to join Black Label, a bike club in the same sense that the Dead Rabbits of the "Gangs of New York" was a club. Black Label is an accretion of social outcasts, or drop outs depending upon whose perspective you employ, whose life orbits outrageous bikes, outrageous dress, and outrageous behavior. Their lifestyle is one punctuated by the massive consumption of alcohol and other mind altering substances in quantities that would appear adequate to ossify a battalion. Once adequately lubricated our heros embark upon bike jousting. Sitting Six or seven feet above the pavement they attempt to dislodge (generally with success) each other (often both) from the seat of their "tall bikes" (multiple frames assembled to create stilt like two wheelers) only to smash assorted body parts into the pavement. Much blood and great times are spilt and had by all!

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands

Yet under this veneer of sadomasochistic excess there lurks a certain innocence, or if not innocence, then at least a Peter Pan-esque youth that insists upon calling the assembled wounded, a family. Family it is, but it is also a political unit. Elections are held, votes are disputed and decisions are made. Often times unilateral edicts are passed down from the ruling elete, others are the result of legitimate democratic process. Babies are conceived and delivered, as are sickness, joy, and sobs.

And so the group moves on from joust to joust, initiation to initiation, road trips, jet bikes, drugs, alcohol, all the elements against which the group rebells distilled, and amplified by their pain and dysfunction. They fall prey to society's ills which are amplified in their microcosm.

Examined closely under the lens of the of the film and more importantly the lens of social interaction we discover their escapism, their withdrawl and yet their insertion into topics of interest to them. They protest the war. They parade in critical mass. Their art cries out for the attention of the society they denounce. They espouse indepence from oil, and yet they build a jet bike, and it works! Far from stupid, these are intelligent talented people who have chosen another way, outside of one I understand or could embrace.

The film is as fractured as the lifestyle. Yet, in being so, it intensifies the experience of confusion and anarchy. I am lost and frequently we are lost together. Yet I enjoyed the film, and I empathized with the family and their outcasts. I felt somehow priviledged to observe, voyeuristically perhaps, a life I could not fathom.

I had the opportunity to ask Tony, why they felt the question stupid, and he replied, "Because... What? They slept through the film? Or they are baiting us? Because it is the bike man, I mean its all there."

There was an answer offered from the audience and we agreed that it was a good one... "Because the bike is the first taste of freedom, the first escape from the watchful eyes of familial control. The Bicycle is the symbol of that freedom and every time we ride we experience once again that feeling of escape." So of course it had to be the B.I.K.E.

Yogurt Vs. Gasoline by Van and Casey Neistat

Yogurt vs. Gasoline: In a short film by the Neistat Brothers humor is employed to make a political statement. The vehicle (pun intended) of their statement is a '76 Schwinn Suburban beater bike, complete with dings, dents and an ample supply of rust acquired through much neglect. Our unlikely hero, a gen X Van Neistat, awakening to his alarm only to realize that he has only a few moments to swallow back his yogurt before he does battle with his foe. In a gutsy display of slacker bravado, we learn that our hero has challenged his arch-nemisis, none other than his brother, Casey Neistat to a race Manhattan, North to South from 94th Street to Franklin and Broadway. The catch is that Van will be racing on his trusty Schwinn while Casey pilots his hand-built 916CC, Italian super bike, a Ducati Monster S4. Using iconic symbolism of the Schwinn, a bike that every child remembers as their first taste of freedom and the Ducati, the sartorial icon of speed, power and excess, to make a poignant message... Guess which icon prevails...

PEDAL by Peter Sutherland

PEDAL: An inside look, depicting the life, lifestyle and hardship of the New York City Bike Messenger. A life of supporting a family on a shoe string, and sometimes dealing with watching the shoestring snap. A life sorting out issues of destitution, substance dependence, injury without health care and life with little hope. The brotherhood of messengers is the only support for some who are part of this world and for most that is all they need. Living and dying by the clock for mere pocket change to get by, messengers have their own way of blowing off steam. PEDAL catches these messengers running Alleycat Races. Alleycats are adrenaline fueled rampages through NYC's busy streets via the fastest way possible. In defiance of the system that holds them down, they forge headlong down city streets narrowly squeezing between busses, darting through red lights within a whisker's breadth of demise. Peter Sutherland catches all of this in first person footage that makes a viewer's stomach wince and sphincter pucker in discomfort at the mere sight of the action. In a very personal and sensitive way, PEDAL captures this lifestyle in a crystalline form.

Heated debates broke out between the filmmakers and the audience in the open forum. Here a Black Label speaks to Peter Sutherlands


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